Is Dyslexia a superpower at work?

You can help uncover the unique talents of individuals with dyslexia

With the increasing levels of dyslexia diagnoses and neurodiverse individuals entering the workforce, F4S has asked the question, can dyslexia be a superpower in the workplace?

In the United States alone, it is estimated that more than 40 million people have dyslexia, but only about 2 million have been diagnosed. This makes it the most common learning difference in the world.

Our goal is to help individuals with dyslexia thrive and realize their full potential at work, and to help leaders to provide a supportive workplace that embraces and celebrates cognitive diversity.

How your answers will help

Together (with your help!) we can achieve the following:

  • Are there motivations and cognitive biases correlated with dyslexia at work?
  • Are there motivations and cognitive biases correlated with specific characteristics of dyslexia at work?
  • Are there motivations and cognitive biases correlated with different forms of dyslexia?
  • Are there motivations and cognitive biases correlated with dyslexia and other forms of neurodiversity?
  • Can changing or developing specific motivations or cognitive style help to better understand and optimize dyslexia at work?

Your benefits for participating:

It will take only 15-25 minutes to answer the two surveys, and in return you’ll get:

  1. Exclusive first access to the global research findings
  2. Immediate access to your personal survey results of your attitudes and motivations as individuals with dyslexia

More about the study

Following Duval’s research in 2013 and 2018 asking the question can entrepreneurial success be predicted, Fingerprint for Success (F4S) has been committed to researching performance, wellbeing and human development in the future of work.

With the increasing levels of dyslexia diagnoses and neurodiverse individuals entering the workforce, F4S has asked the question, can dyslexia be a superpower in the workplace?

In the United States alone, it is estimated that more than 40 million people have dyslexia, but only about 2 million have been diagnosed. This makes it the most common learning disability in the world. Dyslexia is a neurocognitive disorder characterized by impairments in accurate and/or fluent word reading, the DSM–5 further implicates poor spelling accuracy in its definition (APA, 2013) while the ICD–11 includes underdeveloped reading comprehension skills (WHO, 2020). Furthermore, to diagnose dyslexia, the ICD–11 specifies a cognitive discrepancy approach (i.e., significant differences between literacy skills and cognitive ability/abilities; WHO, 2020).

Research speaks to a unique emotional experience stemming from living with an often misunderstood and stereotyped learning difference. From research covering a decade, we have come to learn that although the formal definition of dyslexia is about learning, the implications of having dyslexia affects these individuals in ways that are much more far reaching than the concept of learning.

In their systematic review of the literature, de Beer et al. (2014) found that negative emotions from dyslexia were frequently voiced among the participants when reflecting upon their working lives. This finding is compelling as persistent literacy issues, keeping a job, and mostly negative emotions about dyslexia were mentioned most often in this comprehensive work.

Research supports the need for adults with dyslexia in working environments to seek to improve awareness of one's strengths, limitations, and learning style. Enabling these individuals to obtain roles or work within cultures that complements their unique workstyle.

McNulty (2003) notes that if adults with dyslexia could find the right career niche based upon their talents, they would be able to compensate for their literacy and organizational difficulties and go on to achieve success in the workplace. There are several examples of adults with dyslexia thriving in entrepreneurial environments. Perhaps the most famous of those being Einstein and in modern times, Sir Richard Brandson.

Adults with dyslexia have been noted to possess talents in areas such as empathy, good oral communication skills, creative and problem solving ability, and proficiency in delegation (Logan, 2009). Additionally, entrepreneurs with dyslexia reported thinking differently and generating innovative solutions (Logan & Martin, 2012). A number of studies refer to the creative and problem solving abilities of those with dyslexia (Galaburda, 1993; Reid & Kirk, 2001; West, 2009).

The call for greater research in the field of dyslexia is driven by the need to better understand and advise workplaces and professionals who have contact with adults with dyslexia on how to best tap into the talents and opportunities unique to these individuals.


Who we are

Fingerprint for Success (F4S) is research company and technology used by individuals and teams to understand and bring out the best in themselves and each other at work.

Launched in 2016, our platform is used by people in 195 countries and counting.

Previously, we have partnered with giants like Canva and Startup Genome on global studies that have led to world-first discoveries and the development of alternative treatments, coaching programs, and further research.

For this study, we are aiming to partner with communities that deeply care about advancing research in supporting individuals with dyslexia to achieve their best and highest success.

Your answers are 100% anonymous.

To participate, you will need to share your email address so we can send you the research findings and give you access to your own results from the assessment.

  • Please use the same email for both surveys (so we know you’re done!)
  • Rest assured all of our research analysis is done with de-identified results. This means your name and email is removed from your data and all of your answers are both anonymized and secured for your privacy.

Join our Dyslexia Study

to help better understand and empower those with dyslexia
Take the surveys now